Friday, 26 August 2016

Writers are yellow cars

Every so often, I have a wobble - you've probably been witness to it once or twice: I wonder why I'm even a writer. Because everyone seems to be a writer. Is there really any room for me? I talk to people online, and discover they're writing a book. Or I'll meet someone new in real life, and - guess what? - they're a writer too.

In fact, there seems to be far more writers than readers these days.

#2 son is a budding actor. Today he was telling me about his friends, and they all seem to be part of one acting group or another. As a child, he's drawn to the people who have the same interests, of course - and perhaps acting groups are more prolific for kids these days than when I was at school. None of my friends were actors, and I didn't want to be one - I can't recall any of my non-friends who were actors either.

My husband's first car was a yellow Metro, and I knew how easy it would be to find that car in a multi-storey car park... it would sparkle like a star from a bed of really dull-coloured cars. Until every car seemed to be yellow. Ugh! They weren't all yellow the day before, when we didn't have a yellow car. They were many colours.

Many years later we had an import car - this time, when we met other drivers of the same car on the road, we'd give them a wave. We seemed to be waving an awful lot!

So, perhaps there aren't a limitless numbers of writers oozing out of gaps in the walls or cracks in the pavement. Perhaps, by being a writer, I just notice them more.


This post is brought to you from a really boring bus journey this morning




27 comments:

  1. I just started reading a book called "As They Slept" by Andy Leeks. He decided to write something every day during his commute,so they're just little slices of life from a guy who rides the train every day. This kind of reminds me of the book...

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    1. That sounds like an interesting book, John. I'll check that one out.

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  2. Hi Annalisa - writing is one of the first things we learn to do isn't it - so I guess it's logical we should write something ... and we have to do it in our working lives (usually - or in some way). But you're right ... one idea leads to the same thought process in others ... nothing unusual I say - you are doing it - you're published and being nominated for awards ... Costa Award 2015 for one ... and coming 3rd ...

    Good for you ... John might be on to something for you ... cheers Hilary

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    1. Yes, writing is very natural - writing for pleasure is an easy step beyond that.

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  3. I've found a lot of folks say they write or want to write, but it's the complete follow through where things fall apart. Edit, edit, and edit. Marketing. There's a lot of work beyond that first sentence, as you know and have proven successful at doing. (keep waving as you pass folks!)

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    1. I think people can be drawn to the perceived glamour of writing... ah, I wish it was glamorous - PJs with holes in and a nervous twitch are a good look though, aren't they?

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  4. I agree that a lot of people want to write or have fantasies about writing but actually living your life as a working writer is much more difficult than most people think.

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    1. Yes, exactly. And so many of the writers you consider to be successful are probably working a proper job too, or at least have a second (primary) source of income. It's a shame.

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  5. I think...it's a bit of, attracting who and what you want to attract, and a bit of the sub conscious seeking out like minded people and pursuits.

    It's all good though, as you never know where each 'touch' will take you. From meeting that other writer, you might just hear of a competition, or a writing job, or make a brilliant new friend.

    Embrace every opportunity. :-)

    Be happy. X

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    1. I've definitely been more successful, made more contacts and had more opportunities by meeting authors. The internet has been a huge benefit to me in that respect.

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  6. Writing down what we perceive and things I see that make me go 'hmmmmm'. What intrigues me might not be of interest to the next person. I think that waving to people with the same kind of car has gone by the wayside here, unless it's an expensive exotic car - then it's a 'ah, you have money too!' kind of wave.

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    1. The waving has mostly died out here too, but our cars were so few and far between, we waved out of shock!

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  7. I definitely feel like there isn't enough room for me in the writing world, and lately, it's been a big impediment to me continuing down the path. But I guess that's just par for the course (but you know, I don't play golf, so I wouldn't know)

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    1. As a non-golfer too, I'll just nod and agree. I guess sometimes those feelings make us work harder, to prove we do belong.

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  8. I can relate to this feeling. Have been struggling with it for a while but now I'm finally feeling the love of writing again. We'll see if that lasts LOL.

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    1. I'm glad, Julie. You certainly shouldn't be having those feelings, you're brilliant :-)

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  9. It's difficult to be unique in this tightly connected large population, but you are. None of those writers can write the book you can write. As to the car uniqueness. We had a week of that when we bought our first Prius. None of those were on the road. Then in week two, that's all we saw.

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    1. That's so true, we are all unique. If you gave ten writers the same prompt, the stories would be very different. The car thing is just weird, isn't it?

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  10. I know what you mean. The effort it takes to market and sell a book is huge and the results? Nothing much (yet). Why do I write when I could go back to work? Well, I like writing a lot better. That will have to be enough for now.

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    1. I'm lucky that I like my day job, but I love writing more, too. Hang in there :-)

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  11. I get where you're coming from. It's difficult to feel unique. I'm still struggling to become a published author, but I'm not going to give up. The difference between the millions of people we meet who want to write a book and the rest of us are those us who follow through, regardless of how long it actually takes. BTW, I wanted to be an actor, but my parents refused to pay for it, so I became an attorney, the next best thing. My parents agreed to pay for law school and told me I would be I could use my acting skills in front of the jury - lol.

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    1. Ah, the logic of parents. I wonder how many times we've used diversionary tactics like that too :-) Don't give up, Melissa!

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  12. Perhaps being a writer you DO notice it more ;-)

    Glad to be back. I've missed your blog. :)

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  13. Yes, so many writers ... and so many people who say they plan on writing a book ... and then there are the people who have a perfect idea for a book, but no time to write, so they decide to throw you a bone (and their idea) so that you can write it for them. And then they are surprised when you're not grateful.

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    1. I haven't had people offering me their ideas - although, as us writers know, having the idea is the 'hardest' part ;-)

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  14. I know lots of people who write, but not many of them finish what they start and publish. I'm happy to know several stubborn writers who do finish, though!

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Please comment - I love a good chat!