Friday, 7 February 2014

Elizabeth Seckman's Fate Intended tour stop

Who-hoo, I have a visitor... One of my favourite ladies! And she always tidies up after herself... Welcome Elizabeth Seckman...

Hi Annalisa! Thanks for having me over. I've been here often enough to be a boss and  suggest you put the kettle on. We'll enjoy a cup of tea as we discuss reader input.

Kettle's on, and there are some really chocolatey biscuits in the tin! Now, who've you been talking to recently?

I talked to an avid reader the other day and she shared what I consider valuable advice for us all.

She said she loved to buy indie and small pub books, because...

The price is right. She knows the editing might not always be as tight as a big pub, but the $10 price difference makes up for that.

She likes how there is less "formula" fiction in indie and small pub. Story lines are fresher when you stray from the mainstream.

Indie and small pub writers are easily reached and most are friendly and sooo appreciative of a kind word.

And what rabid reader wouldn't love to discover the next E.L. James or Colleen Hoover?

But the one drawback, as she sees it?

Indies and small pubs have a tendency to ramble about in their stories.

Hmm. Why would that be?

There is a saying, you can either be the dog of kings or the king of the dogs.

With indies and small pubs, a writer is given much more authority and leeway than at a big house. Hence, the king of the dogs. Most times, to accept or deny an edit is up to the writer.

In a big house, these writers are working for the kings, but as their dog. They say make an edit, I'll bet that edit is made.

The freedom of the small pubs and indies puts the burden of responsibility almost solely on the writer.

For myself, I try to avoid this by using several betas and listening when there is unity in opinion.If more than one person sees the problem...cut it; change it...whatever it takes; fix it.

It's best to listen before publication rather than hear it in a review after publication.


Fate Intended is the third book in the Coulter Men Series.  Trip is the last of the Coulter sons to find love. He’s a handsome man with all the skills a young spy needs to succeed. But when it comes to love, he misses the target. Jane is a sweet beauty who may or may not be wanted for murder. She’s hiding out as a cleaning lady when chance brings her and Trip together. It looks like a happily ever after is in the cross hairs until reality tries to destroy what fate has intended.



Elizabeth Seckman is a simple chick with a simple dream…to write stories people want to read.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

79 comments:

  1. Editing indie authors is no easy task sometimes lol. It's really difficult because it's hard to see my name on a book as editor when the author has chosen to not make the changes suggested. :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anyone who ignores your suggestions is a fool, Kyra :-)

      Delete
    2. Ugh. That would be hard! Do you ever want to add a disclaimer Kyra?

      Delete
    3. What's the point of having an editor if you don't LISTEN to the editor?

      Delete
  2. Get outta here! Next you'll be telling us that Elizabeth cleaned your whole house before she left, Annalisa.
    She didn't do that for me. Come back now Elizabeth and sort it out!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oooh, Elizabeth's in trouble :-)

      Delete
    2. No worry of that Fanny! I don't even clean my own house :)

      Delete
  3. I make most of the changes suggested by my critique partners and all of the edits by my publisher's editor. They are usually right anyway.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Listening to people who have a bit of distance is certainly worthwhile.

      Delete
    2. When Fate Intended went to edit, I went through and did all the corrections etc. and then emailed my editor the original (I always make a spare copy, just in case) and when he got it, he thought I rejected every single change. He was very diplomatic in the return email that said he knew it was my choice, but I needed to seriously reconsider changing nothing in the novel. I'd have sent me a "I'm going to strangle you!" email!

      Delete
  4. Good advice!
    I never thought about that before, the difference in editorial demands at the indie level. It's a very good point, though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like having a bit more control, I think, though. But I won't know until my Big 4 deal comes through... (hahahaha)

      Delete
    2. It is both a blessing and a curse to have control. And no one person is ever always right. That's why I like to have several people give me input. If I hear from more than two that something is an issue...that's a red flag.

      Delete
  5. Yes indie runs the risk of not always putting out your best work because of all the pressure. But I'm glad readers notice the fresh ideas small pub and indie writers provide. Inspiring post Liz.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, that was a really positive point to take from the post, wasn't it?

      Delete
    2. A good indie book is like a breath of fresh air. I love well written surprises.

      Delete
  6. I like the distinctions you made regarding indie and small pub books; they also made me think of indie films, especially when you mentioned rambling. I love watching independent films, because like indie and small pub books, they often cover different areas of life that haven't been portrayed over and over again in mainstream films. But one thing I do notice about certain (though not all) indie films are several scenes that should have been cut or shortened due to all the rambling that certain characters did.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it might be even more obvious in films, actually. I have to admit, I can be a bit of a skimmer when I'm faced with a lengthy ramble.

      Delete
    2. You're totally right. I think with big film/big book makers, there are several sets of eyes to give a critical edit to the tale...whereas with an indie, it is being modified by its creator who loves every sentence and line of her/his little darling. Less objectivity in indie.

      Delete
    3. There's also the joy of absolutely NO ONE catching an error either in film or books.

      Delete
    4. Jay, my husband is the master of finding errors in movies. Even the big films have their little flaws.

      Delete
  7. Hey Annalisa,

    Check under the carpet... I think you will find that *that's* where are the crumbs and dust went to.... That Seckman, let me tell you...

    PS...enjoyed the post, eTwinny and you made perfect sense (Is there a full moon tonight? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Checking now, thanks for the heads up, Mark :-)

      Delete
    2. I never understood why my mom got irritated when I shoved the crumbs under the rug...I mean out of sight is the goal, right?

      Did I make sense? Egads. Maybe the moon is full!

      Delete
  8. Great advice from Elizabeth! I had never thought of the difference between small and large publishers - mainly because I'm so far from subbing a novel it's almost irrelevant! I'll be thinking about it now, though!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. All parts of the industry are worth considering, whatever stage of the process you're at.

      Delete
    2. Linda I remember reading blog posts about things like marketing and promotion and I'd think it didn't apply to me, but then suddenly it did and I was trying to play catch up!

      Delete
  9. very good post. However when the big boys and girls ramble it's "literary". Think about it - my biggest example is Joyce Carol Oates. Sometimes her writing is sublime, and other times she gets away with a ton of blather. No matter how one is publishing, kill the darlings is good advice. Have a great weekend to all

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh my goodness. EXCELLENT point Joanne! I refuse to read any book that blathers on, I mean if you start out a story with more than a half page of description, I'm out of there. Sometimes I think that circular literary overkill just makes people feel smart. I don't read to look smart. I want something good that entertains me.

      Delete
    2. I've tried so hard to read some authors because everyone else raves about them, but I agree, they're using their name to waffle on a bit :-)

      Delete
  10. Great post! There are so many fantastic indie and small press authors. I agree sometimes the editing isn't the best, but sometimes they surprise you. I'm lucky one of my CPs is a fabulous editor and she keeps me in line.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I read your first story in the 13th Floor series. You know what you're doing lady! Your CP is fabulous!

      Delete
    2. Totally agree with Elizabeth here, The 13th Floor series is very well written :-) Ahem, do I know this CP at all??

      Delete
    3. You know Cherie Reich! I'm a very lucky gal to have her as my CP. :)

      Delete
  11. Hi, thanks for visiting my blog Annalisa. I like the Stephen King quote, Elizabeth!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stephen King really is, well, the King!

      Delete
    2. You're welcome, Barry. I hope you enjoy the blogging experience.

      Delete
    3. Yeah Stephen King has written some great books. I just think sometimes he struggles with his endings, e.g. "The Stand". Another thing that amazes me is how well some of his stories are adapted to film. "Stand by me," "Shawshank Redemption," and "The Green Mile" are all actually better than the books in my opinion. On the other hand, "The Shining" is one of the scariest and most atmospheric books I've ever read. And yet the film fails to capture/convey any of that. I think Stephen King himself was unhappy with that film.

      Delete
    4. Even the greats can't be perfect all of the time and there is such a variety of taste among readers and viewers. And some stories, like The Shining, are always better books because sometimes motive and insanity don't translate as well in film.

      Delete
    5. Very true, I've read a lot of His books. (Although not many of his later ones). My personal favorites Include, The dark half, Needful things, and, of course, The shining. The guy's obviously a genius, and like you say, can't always be perfect. Which is not surprising, considering the amount he's written. I may have to explore some of his later books

      Delete
    6. I need read more of his books. I read the Dark Tower book one and didn't like it. But it wasn't my flavor. Well written and wonderful, but just not my kind of read.

      Delete
    7. Very prolific writer. Dark tower was his attempt at fantasy wasn't it? I've never read it. I remember enjoying The Stand when it first came out (over thirty years ago my God!). I still love The Shining though. It's one of those books that makes you feel uneasy and disturbed, in a good way.

      Delete
  12. Thank you having me over Annalisa! And for the tea and biscuits. I've never had a chocolate biscuit...so excited!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Always a pleasure, Elizabeth. I just noticed the Rafflecopter thingy didn't work like it has on all the other stops. I think I must have done something wrong.

      Delete
    2. I can email you another code. I probably messed up the cutting and pasting. (But only change it if you feel like it!)

      Delete
  13. As a fan of Anna, Elizabeth and indie work, this was a special treasure.

    Some kind of wonderful E!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw Jay...you're such a smooth talker. You've been hanging out with Dan too long ;)

      Delete
  14. I'm enjoying working with indie publishers this year. I've enjoyed many small press books. Formulas get tiring.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Medeia, you're so meticulous, I believe you could write well under any conditions! And yes, I'd rather find a few typos than know where the story is headed after page ten.

      Delete
  15. Totally agree. Much better to fix it when fixing is possible rather than getting nailed for it later. Great post!

    Sarah Allen
    (From Sarah, With Joy)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep. Reviewers can be harsh! Best to polish as much out as you can before they get hold of it.

      Delete
  16. An interesting post that I enjoyed reading.

    Thank you. Love love, Andrew. Bye.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Yay for Elizabeth! I'd much rather wear a crown than lick water from a bowl.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Elizabeth's dream is one this Elizabeth shares!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Interesting interview and what a beautiful cover!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love the cover too. Lindsay Anne Kendal is to thank for that!

      Delete
    2. Yes it is a lovely cover, Rebecca!

      Delete
  20. Great Post! I'm happy you had Elizabeth over to talk about that subject. I have a small writing project. My goal is to self publish it. It will ultimately be an e-read. Because this chance may never come my way again (I consider myself a hobby writer) I didn't skimp on the proofing and editing and chose to have it looked at by a professional to spit shine it up first.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wise woman. I often think of myself as a hobby writer too. I know there are things I could do to make more money with it, but I never want to kill the joy of writing. I'd be lost if I came to hate my words!

      Delete
    2. Good for you Gossip_Grl. Writing is hard work... consider yourself 'a writer' :-)

      Delete
  21. Great interview. Thanks, Annalisa for introducing me to Elizabeth and her work. Love the blurb for Fate Intended. I'm going to have to give this series a look =)

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hi Annalisa and Elizabeth,

    I know, what the heck took me so long. Fate Intended me to get here late in the festivities. Some wise and thoughtful words from the wise and thoughtful Elizabeth. Can I assume, "small pubs", are typical English village drinking establishments?

    Gary :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course that's what 'small pubs' means, Gary! What else could they possibly be?? ;-)

      Delete
    2. Always better late than never Gary...even at the pub!

      Delete
  23. Great advice. I think surrounding yourself with "yes-men" is quite dangerous. We all like our ego stroked, but improving the craft is more important.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've never had a yes-man... I must get one of those one day, just for fun. I could keep him in the cupboard and pull him out when I needed a boost :-)

      Delete
  24. That Stephen King quote made me laugh. But it's so hard....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I recently killed two-thirds of a book. I got a strange kick after a while, and if a page remained untouched I went back to cut something :-)

      Delete
    2. If it's a very dear darling, getting a few opinions before slicing wouldn't hurt.

      Delete

Please comment - I love a good chat!