Thursday, 24 January 2013

Elizabeth Seckman's Healing Summer Blog Tour

I'm delighted to welcome Elizabeth Seckman here today as part of her Healing Summer blog tour. I have just finished reading Past Due, the first in the Coulter Men series, and I'm really looking forward to reading about the bad boy of the Coulter family!

I gave Elizabeth the prompt: My Perfect Summer's Day






Hi Annalisa! Thanks for taking the time to host me. I know you’re getting ready to start your own tour and hop, so best of luck on that!

You asked about my perfect summer day? Well, this is the first thing that pops into my mind…

Many years ago, when my oldest son was just a year old, he loved to go outside. Once set free, Caleb would explore. He has always been bright child, so it isn’t surprising that during his second summer on earth, he was intent on learning everything. He’d weed through blade after blade of grass to find an ant. Then he’d watch it as it would roam about like we would watch a lion at the zoo. Then he’d spy a bird in a tree and he would point and watch in awe as it took flight.

To him, the world was fresh and new.

All the things that I saw each day and had come to ignore, he was fascinated by. He could lie in the grass for long minutes (which in toddler time is like hours) and watch the clouds move across the sky, then gasp as a plane flew over. Every little bit of this planet was an intrigue.

Bark on a tree.
The texture of concrete.
A shadow compliments of the sun.
Those things were as exciting to him as the Magic Kingdom.

And on those perfect summer days, he taught me an important lesson in writing:

Look at the world as if you have never seen it before. Look beyond the snap image the brain has pre-loaded like clip art for us. I say grass and you see green…but look closer…there is a smell, a texture, a bend to each blade that you might have long stopped recognizing. That’s where we will find the depth, the clarity, and the realism to make our lies more real.

Or ask a toddler, “What do you see?” and quickly write that down!

Great tips Elizabeth - I'm off to ask the nearest toddler!!


Maybe Love, Not Time, Heals All Wounds
Ditched at the altar…biopsied for cancer…Mollie Hinkle is having a bona fide bitch of a summer. When life sucks so hard it takes your breath away, what's a girl to do? Pack a bag, grab a few friends, and leave the past and the worry in the rear view mirror. What wounds can’t be healed by a drive across the Heartland, where quarter flips at cross roads determine the route and the future? All roads lead to Craig, the second son and bad boy of the haughty Coulter line. Has fate brought her to the miniscule Montana town to find happily ever after or will it just break her heart?
“Healing Summer” is the second book in the Coulter Men Series.


Elizabeth Seckman

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57 comments:

  1. Children truly have the freshest perspectives. As a baby I moved around a lot too. Once I got my feet to the ground and went off still connected to my high chair. Least that's what my mother told me. I must really had something I wanted to see.

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    1. I love watching children play - they really are fascinated by everything!

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    2. One of my sons walked at 9 months...what a horror!

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  2. What a fabulous post! It's true, as we grow up, we forget to notice the little things.

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    1. I haven't forgotten. I walk around in a state of wonder, and I'll say something like 'Look at that cloud' to a friend, but they look at me like I'm mad! :-D

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    2. Thanks Kyra! I'm one of those people who gets so busy I forget to look at everything!

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  3. As if you've never seen it before - wow, that is powerful!

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  4. I have similar memories of summer days and my kids. We used to keep wood "shelves" on our front porch to display all the cool rocks and treasures they discovered. Best to Elizabeth on this tour!

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    1. A shelf is what I need - I get handfuls of shells given to me after they've been on the beach with their grandparents.

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    2. I have jars I would fill with the treasure they would bring me over the months. Then when it was filled, I'd date it and keep it. I have lots of magic rocks!

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  5. I love this post. It's true that we look without seeing most of the time... I do wish you hadn't reminded us about lovely summer days though. It's freezing here!

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    1. I agree, it is freezing. But all I want to do now is put a summer dress on.

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    2. Rosalind, thanks and sorry. :(
      (But the real blame is Annalisa's, she made me do it ;)

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    3. Yeah, I didn't really think the prompt through properly :-)

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  6. Looking at something with new eyes is so hard to do. I often imagine I'm sketching it - taking shape and shade and general form before it finally turns into what it really is supposed to be. Don't know if I explained that very well! Great post - and now I'm looking forward to summer!

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    1. I know what you mean, Linda, and that's a great way to really see something!

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    2. Makes perfect sense Linda. I am artistically inept, so I am in awe of people who can visualize from memory and re-create. That is truly a gift!

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  7. I'm often trying to get out of my head. It's tough. With the cold weather, I'm longing for a perfect summer day. All success to Elizabeth.

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    1. I think we're all longing for a perfect summer day after this post!

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    2. Thanks M! And I'm longing for summer too!

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  8. It's definitely true that little kids are more aware of their surroundings. They haven't reached that point yet where they're more easily distracted by cell phones, laptops, iPods, etc. I think that I'd be able to see and hear things more clearly without all my electronic devices, too.

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    1. I try not to, but I'm sometimes guilty of walking along the road checking my emails!

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    2. You're so right. I'm guilty of getting side tracked too.

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  9. That is an important lesson. I like watching children experience things for the first time. It brings me back to moments of discovery, which I sometimes tap into while writing.

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    1. Children seeing snow for the first time always makes me smile.

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    2. Yes, the wonder of snow is awesome! I remember my son running out into it shoeless. That was a lesson learned!

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  10. It is easy to confuse taking a quick glance with actually looking at something unless we give it our full attention.

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    1. People are in such a rush these days.

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    2. And it's easy to rush, but needing to put detail sin our writing is an excuse to slow down.

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  11. That's lovely. We should learn from toddlers and slow down to appreciate everything around us.

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  12. I read somewhere once that the key to happiness is to look at the world as though through the eyes of a child...

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    1. I actually do that. Clouds and rainbows have me staring at the sky when I should be watching where I'm walking!

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  13. Hi Annalisa,

    Have you missed me? Yes? No? Anyway, Elizabeth's blog tour for her book, "Healing Summer". Excellent and very good of you to be involved with this, Annalisa. We must never lose the curiosity that is our 'inner child'.

    And now, I shall gaze out upon the snowstorm we are experiencing and have a big mug of hot Belgian chocolate, complete with extra marshmallows.

    Have a pleasant weekend.

    Gary

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    1. It's an honour to have you visit, Gary! I think your inner child is definitely being indulged with the hot chocolate and marshmallows. Enjoy!

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    2. Enjoy Gary. Great way to fend off winter cold.

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  14. Fantastic post! I love experiencing the world with my toddler. I need to carry a notebook around more often!

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    1. You definitely need to make the most of your little muse running around :-)

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  15. He could lie in the grass for long minutes, and watch the clouds move across the sky. Every little bit of this planet was an intrigue.
    ...... a child's world is the best. Wonder why we change when we grow up.

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    1. It's a shame we change, isn't it, but I think it's probably got something to do with the need to pay bills :-(

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    2. Annalisa is so right. Too many obligations in the adult world. Sigh.

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  16. I love the idea of looking at the world as if through a toddler's eyes, or someone's eyes who has never seen it before. Great thought!

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    1. Actually it's similar to giving your brand new WIP to someone for the first time - they're seeing your world through different eyes.

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  17. I love how children can give us those reminders we need!

    Allison (Geek Banter)

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    1. I always get caught out when I'm busy doing housework or something equally fun (?!) and my son says 'But I want to play with you'... I really do need to play more!

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  18. I try to remind myself to see things through my children's eyes. The way they view the world is truly amazing.

    I enjoyed this. Thanks!

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  19. I agree, I love talking to my young grand children and getting their perspective. I wish I could still view the world so innocent! Definitely checking out Elizabeth's book. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. My kids sometimes trail off into very surreal areas. I'm sat there open-mouthed trying to figure out what they're saying!

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    2. Thanks Gossip grl!

      And Annalisa, you're right. My kids have come up with some awesome story lines!

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Please comment - I love a good chat!