Saturday, 25 April 2015

Views From a Yellow Metro




“Paint how you feel,” is her instruction. So I do; I paint a little yellow Metro driving along a country lane. Because yellow Metros are happy things. I paint the sun high in the dazzling blue sky and cows grazing in the lush green grass. Smiling faces peering out of the windows, waving and smiling.
Memories surface as I create my scene. Friends squeezed in for trips to the beach, for spontaneous camping at the foot of Glastonbury.
Halfway along the canvass this happy countryside image stops. I fill my brush with black paint and smudge it into the painting; creating darkness, nothingness. I can’t stop myself. The picture fragments, the road they are travelling along becomes a bleak and unwritten place.
“Is that how you feel?” she asks, appearing over my shoulder.
“I don’t know,” I reply.

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50 comments:

  1. So AMAZING!! I love, love, love your pieces.

    You can find me here:
    ClarabelleRant

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  2. Hi Annalisa .. I could see the happy scene - shattered by the black painted cover up ... how well written .. the bleakness of that time ..it's set me thinking ... Hilary

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    1. I like to write things that make people think :-)

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  3. So conflicted - incredibly happy to dark despair - I can see the painting in my mind's eye. Very evocative.
    Tasha
    Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

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  4. A thought provoking piece indeed. I used to have a red Metro!

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    1. My husband's first car was a yellow Metro, so now if I ever need a beat-up old banger in my work, they are always yellow Metros.

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  5. Painting, like all other forms of art, is a means of expression. The black paint is probably the narrator's way of depicting the fleeting nature of happiness. It is there one second and gone the next.

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    1. Yes, an artist probably wouldn't be completely literal - that's a good point.

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  6. You certainly took me on a journey with this piece. Excellent!

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    1. Thanks Noelle. You've visited my blog a couple of times, but I can't find yours to return the favour. Can you leave a link, please? :-)

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  7. Love this, as usual Annalisa. Great writing.

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  8. Interesting story. Artists often do use how they feel in their work.

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    1. The same way I use my writing as a way of releasing pent up emotions.

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  9. That memory took a turn for the worse.

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  10. I was asked to paint how i felt at art class once. My brother had just died. The teacher was more careful after that.

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    1. I'm sorry for your loss, Liz. I can imagine that wasn't the best way to phrase her request under the circumstances.

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  11. Your pieces have such an amazing depth to them. You always take something that's been inside me and throw it out onto paper that makes me wonder if you've been riding around in my head. Uncanny.

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    1. Thank you Rena. I have weird thoughts, so it's great when other people can relate to them :-)

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  12. Now that was intriguing. I'm wondering what kind of art class this is. Is it for people that have suffered trauma and they must paint out their emotions/feelings. Or, is it like many of us, we have a dark element that rears its ugly head when we least expect it, and we can't explain it.

    Fascinating. What a great V post.

    Sent with smiles, Jenny, Pearson Report
    2015 A to Z Challenge Ambassador
    @PearsonReport

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    1. I assumed it was a general art class, Jenny, and her dark elements just surfaced.

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  13. I love it, like all of your stories I've read so far. I wonder what happened?

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  14. When I was a little girl, I colored everything in strange colors. The school psychologist and my parents tried to figure out what was up. There was no bizarre mystery, I used the colors a short girl could reach on the school shelf. So, I'm going to assume the sunny day faded to night. :)

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    1. Lol, Elizabeth. Those psychologists do find a way of analysing EVERYTHING, don't they?

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  15. Beautiful. I love the imagery. And yellow is such a moody color. :)

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  16. You set up an interesting contrast.

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  17. My color is blue. When I used to paint I went heavy on shades of blue.

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  18. whoa. It reminds of a scene in the movie "Annie Hall". They are driving and Annie' (Diane Keaton's) brother (a young Christopher Walken) says something very foreboding about crashing the car. Woody Allen's face is hilarious. Anyway - good writing. Very deep

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    1. I've never seen Annie Hall. I love foreboding things :-)

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  19. Yellow is a cheery color. This artist was happy riding along in the metro viewing the surroundings until something else entered her mind causing her to reach for a brush dipped in black paint to erase it all in a flash. Interesting. Is she troubled or is life that way, good one minute and bad the next?

    Sunni
    http://sunni-survivinglife.blogspot.com/

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    1. I think life can definitely be like that, Sunni.

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  20. I sometimes use art with children who are going through emotional problems to allow them to express their feelings about certain things - it seems to allow them to talk much more openly when they are drawing and allows discussion of difficult topics at times. Lovely to meet through the A to Z Challenge :)

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    1. Thanks for visiting! I understand how art can help kids open up. It's great that you help them cope.

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  21. aren't we always confused? that reflects in many things we do

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    1. Oh yes, confusion is apparent in many aspects of our lives.

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  22. Hmm... sometimes the line between how we feel and how we want to feel is blurry.

    I wasn't familiar with "Metro" as a car make before. I tend to think of it more in terms of public transit, though we don't have Metrobuses or Metro trains near me either. Thanks for sharing!

    Visit my new author blog at http://chriskelworth.com/

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    1. Exactly, Chris :-)

      Metros are great little cars. We had so much fun in our little yellow Metro. In fact, we loved being in it so much our local pub was 30 minutes drive away!

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  23. That was quite haunting and you switched it in a flash, but reading the opening again it seems quite a forced, childlike image of happiness (sun in the sky, smiling faces). So I'm intrigued by this underlying darkness just waiting to rear its head.

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    1. I like to write things that benefit from a re-read, wrong-footing the reader initially :-)

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  24. I wonder what memory or realization caused the narrator to suddenly switch to the black. Such a haunting piece.

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  25. So intriguing! I want to know what to happened to make them feel that way!

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    1. Sometimes, there is no reason, Rachel; sometimes, there's a whole heap of them.

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Please comment - I love a good chat!